top of page

Training School 101

Last month was all things nutrition and this month we are talking TRAINING. This post breaks down 4 variables of training that can really make or break an effective program, let's dive in!

 

WARM-UP VS. WORKING SETS


What exactly is a warm-up set?

  • Warm-up sets should be done for the major compound movements within your training program.

  • The goal of a warm-up set is NOT to produce fatigue and shouldn't reduce your effort to perform at maximum capacity during your working sets.

  • Assigning a specific RPE to a warm-up set helps keep intensity low-to-moderate.

Why are warm-up sets important?

  • They help you practice technique and check your form before loading that movement with a substantial/challenging weight load.

  • They encourage blood flow to the working muscle group(s).

  • They help establish a starting weight for your first working set.

  • They help prepare your nervous system for that specific movement pattern.

 

TRAINING SPLITS


What exactly is a training split?

  • A training split is how you plan or program your workouts for a given week or set of days.

  • This can be done in various ways that include specific body regions, lifts, specific body parts, or by movement.

  • Training splits should be designed with goal(s) in mind, access to equipment, time/availability, and level of knowledge as it pertains to training.


What considerations need to be made when choosing or creating a training split?

  • Time commitment

  • Training experience

  • Weaknesses/Imbalances

  • Goals

What are some training split examples?

  • 3-day training split

    • PUSH / PULL / LEGS

    • TOTAL / TOTAL / TOTAL

    • UPPER / LOWER / TOTAL

    • UPPER / LOWER / UPPER

  • 4-day training split

    • UPPER / LOWER / UPPER / LOWER

    • ANTERIOR / POSTERIOR (REPEAT)

    • PUSH / LEGS / PULL / LEGS

  • 5-day training split

    • UPPER / LOWER / UPPER / LOWER / UPPER

    • CHEST & TRICEPS / LEGS / BACK & BICEPS / LEGS / SHOULDERS & CORE

  • 6-day training split

    • PUSH / PULL / LEGS (REPEAT)

    • ANTERIOR / POSTERIOR (REPEAT x2)

    • CHEST / HAMSTRINGS & GLUTES / SHOULDERS / QUADS / BACK / ARMS

 

RIR and RPE


What exactly is RPE?

  • Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE) is a subjective, qualitative sliding scale (from 1-10) for measuring training effort

What exactly is RIR?

  • Reps in Reserve (RIR) is another subjective, qualitative tool for measuring training effort.

  • This can best be understood as a mind muscle connection to how many reps you feel you have left in the tank at a particular load at the conclusion of the set.

What's the difference between the two & how are they used?

  • RPE is often a bit more understood; RIR is a great tool for more seasoned lifters due to the need for mind muscle connection

  • Both are completely subjective in how you FEEL during training which can change day to day based on other external factors beyond true strength.

How can RPE and RIR enhance training?

  • They help you become more in-tune with your lifting intensities and efforts

  • They help better periodize your training efforts.

  • They help you assess PRs (personal records) under different circumstances.

 

Rest Periods


What exactly is a rest period?

  • A rest period is the time between reps during exercise or training.

  • Rest periods vary depending on goals and current training, but often range anywhere from 30 seconds up to 5 minutes.

Why are rest periods important?

  • The amount of rest between sets can influence efficiency, safety, recovery, and overall effectiveness/progress of your training

What are some rest period examples?

  • Strength and power : 2-5 minutes

  • Hypertrophy : 30-90 seconds

  • Muscular Endurance : 30 seconds (or less)


 

Find this helpful and plan to implement these into your training program? Let us know in the comments and be sure to find us on Instagram (where we share education like this weekly!)

13 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All
bottom of page